Library

Incorporated within the library are various documents specific to active shooting, including government documents, research papers, active shooter after-action reports, statistical analysis, thesis papers and pamphlets. Some of the references are specific to a particular business model, such as schools, healthcare and places of worship, while other documents are specific to one particular active shooting emergency. Lastly, the library is sub-divided into six (6) categories for ease of use, and include After Action Reports, General, Healthcare, Reports, Schools and Workplace Violence.

< CHOOSE A CATEGORY
  • Date
  • Article Title
  • Source
  • Description
  • View
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  • 5/2001
  • The Report of Governor Bill Owens: Columbine Review Commission
  • State of Colorado, Hon. William H. Erickson, Chairman
  • The commission’s assigned duties were to review the events occurring on April 20, 1999 at Columbine High School and to submit recommendations for preventing or handling similar emergencies should they arise in the future.
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  • 188
  • 8/18/2010
  • Final Recommendations of the Ft. Hood Follow-on Review
  • The Secretary of Defense
  • The tragic shooting of U.S. military personnel at Fort Hood in November 2009 underscored the need for the DoD to thoroughly review its approach to force
    protection and to broaden its force protection, policies, programs and procedures to go beyond their traditional focus on hostile external threats.
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  • 12
  • 1/2010
  • Protecting the Force: Lessons from Fort Hood
  • Department of Defense
  • Conducting our review, we have reached a number of conclusions and made corresponding recommendations; they are reflected in the chapters that follow.
  • Click Here
  • 86
  • 4/16/2007
  • Mass Shooting at Virginia Tech: Report of the Review Panel
  • Virginia Tech Review Panel
  • On April 16, 2007, one student, senior Seung Hui Cho, murdered 32 and injured 17 student and faculty in two related incidents on the campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (“Virginia Tech”). Three days later, Virginia Governor Tim Kaine commissioned a panel of experts to conduct an independent, thorough, and objective review of the tragedy and to make recommendations regarding improvements to the Commonwealth’s laws, policies, procedures, systems and institutions, as well as those of other governmental entities and private providers.
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  • 260
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  • Century Theater Shooting: Aurora Fire Department Preliminary Incident
    Analysis
  • City of Aurora
  • On July 20th, 2012, at approximately 12:40 am, a gunman opened fire in Century 16 Theater #9 where more than 400 people were attending the premier of The Dark Knight Rises. By 12:46 am the Aurora Fire Department and Rural Metro Ambulance were on scene and treating injured patients. By 1:33 am 70 patients were transported to area hospitals. 12 people died from their injuries.
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  • 28
  • 3/26/2014
  • Enhancing TSA Officer Safety and Security
  • Department of Homeland Security, Transportation Safety Administration
  • In response to the tragic shooting of Transportation Security Officer (TSO) Gerardo I. Hernandez and wounding of other TSA employees and a passenger on November 1, 2013, at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX), Administrator John S. Pistole called for a comprehensive review of the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) policies, procedures, and training to identify possible improvements to safety and security for TSA employees. The following report provides a summary of TSA actions as a result of this review.
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  • 26
  • 8/4/2010
  • Fort Hood - Army Internal Review Team: Final Report
  • U.S. Department of the Army
  • The Army’s Soldiers, Families and Civilians deserve a safe and secure environment to work, train and live. The Army’s efforts in this regard are not new and they began long before the tragic events of 5 November 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas where the Army family lost thirteen of its members and 31 wounded. The Fort Hood Army Internal Review Team dedicates the recommendations and plans in this report to the victims and their families with the prospect of precluding such an event from happening in the future.
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  • 122
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  • Active Shooter Response: Public Safety and Security
  • US. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA, Lessons Learned Information Sharing
  • The Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS.gov) team analyzed 30 active shooter After Action Reports (AARs) to determine trends in active shooter responses related to public safety and security. The team analyzed these AARs to find recurring issues emergency managers and responders frequently come across to help minimize the impact of an active shooter incident and ensure proper security within the affected area.
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  • 10
  • 3/18/2014
  • Active Shooter Incident and Resulting Airport Disruption: A Review of
    Response Operations
  • Los Angeles World Airports
  • Los Angeles International Airport After Action Report relative to the November 1, 2013 lone gunman murder of a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officer.
  • Click Here
  • 99
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  • Active Shooter Response:On-site Incident Management
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA
  • The Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS.gov) team analyzed 30 active shooter After Action Reports (AARs) and identified trends in on-site inciden management procedures during a response to an active shooter incident. The active shooter AAR research and analysis showed that establishing on-site incident management during an active shooter incident, in order to maintain situational awareness, is an important aspect of the response effort.
  • Click Here
  • 9
  • 7/2014
  • After Action Report, Washington Navy Yard, September 16, 2013: Internal Review of the Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.
  • Metropolitan Police Department, Washington, D.C.
  • The following report provides a narrative of the multi-agency response and culminates in a summary of MPD’s overall observations and recommendations. The Department hopes it may provide other agencies with insight into the police response that day and help us all to be better prepared in the event of a future incident.
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  • 83
  • 4/15/2008
  • State of Illinois Campus Security Task Force Report to the Governor
  • Illinois Emergency Management Agency, Campus Security Task Force
  • This Report of CSTF to the Governor represents the consensus of over 75 organizations from the response, mental health, legal, and higher education communities. This Report is a tool for campus leaders and their partners in surrounding communities, to use to enhance all facets of campus security – prevention, response, recovery and related legal issues.
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  • 57
  • 11/25/2013
  • Report of the State’s Attorney for the Judicial District of Danbury on the Shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School and 36 Yogananda Street, Newtown,
    Connecticut on December 14, 2012
  • OFFICE OF THE STATE’S ATTORNEY, JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF DANBURY
  • The purpose of this report is to identify the person or persons criminally responsible for the twenty-seven homicides that occurred in Newtown, Connecticut, on the morning of December 14, 2012, to determine what crimes were committed, and to indicate if there will be any state prosecutions as a result of the incident.
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  • 48
  • 2/2015
  • Final Report of the Sandy Hook Advisory Commission
  • The Sandy Hook Advisory Commission
  • The recommendations you will craft over the coming weeks and months will no doubt take us towards the goal, that goal, better mental health, better safety in our schools, and a system that is set up to stop the glorification of violence, but before you get started, there are a few things that I want you to consider.
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  • 256
  • 8/2010
  • Lessons Learned in Response and Recovery: Northern Illinois University
  • Lt. Darren Mitchell, Office of Emergency Management & Planning, Northern Illinois University
  • The report identifies various lesson learned concerning the February 14, 2008 shooting on the Northern Illinois University campus.
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  • 40
  • n/a
  • Northern Illinois University Shooting, USFA-TR-167/February 2008 DeKalb, Illinois
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA, U.S. Fire Administration
  • On February 14, 2008, less than 1 year after a senior at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) murdered 32 people and committed suicide, the campus community at Northern Illinois University (NIU), in DeKalb, Illinois, faced a similar horror. A former NIU graduate student walked onto the stage of a large lecture hall and began firing on startled students and faculty. The shooter, a 28-year old male, had a history of mental illness. He shot and killed 5 students and wounded 18, some critically. His suicide at the end of the brief attack brought the number of deaths to 6.
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  • 48
  • 9/28/2010
  • Active Shooter /Suicide After Action Report
  • Police Department The University of Texas at Austin
  • The active action report is written concerning an active shooting that occurred on the morning of September 28, 2010, a sophomore mathematics student, Colton J. Tooley, boarded a city bus headed for The University of Texas at Austin campus.
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  • Active Shooter in a House of Worship
  • National Disaster Interfaiths Network
  • While houses of worship traditionally are places of safety and peace, they are not immune to gun violence. While shootings in houses of worship are rare, they can result in many fatalities and traumatize a community. As a religious leader, you should help your congregation be prepared for this type of crisis—and, if necessary, lead your community through a healthy recovery process.
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  • 2
  • 2/11/11
  • Active Shooter in the Library: How to Plan for, Prevent and Survive the Worst
  • Amy Kautzman Library Leadership & Management
  • You are in your office puzzling over an especially sticky grant proposal when you hear quiet pops in the distance. Thinking that teenagers are setting off firecrackers, you turn back to your personnel listing and salary descriptions – only to become aware that people are shouting and screaming outside of your office. What do you do?
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  • 13
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  • Clackamas Town Center
  • Source: Regional Disaster Preparedness Capabilities (REDCAP) Report
  • When armed assailant Jacob Roberts went on a shooting spree at the Clackamas Town Center on December 11, 2012, randomly killing two innocent bystanders and wounding another before taking his own life, the Portland Metropolitan Region added its name to the growing list of cities and metropolitan regions impacted by a mass casualty, active shooter event.
  • Click Here
  • 4
  • 10/2008
  • Active Shooter: How to Respond
  • Department of Homeland Security
  • Quickly determine the most reasonable way to protect your own life. Remember that customers and clients are likely to follow the lead of employees and managers during an active shooter situation.
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  • 13
  • 11/1997
  • Analysis of Casualty Rates & Patterns Likely to Result from Military Operations in Urban Environments
  • Colonel (Retd) RA Leitch MBE RGN, Dr. HR Champion F.R.C.S (Edin) F.A.C.S. Dr. JF Navein MB ChB M.RC.G.P.
  • The study aimed to identify the key factors affecting health care support and wounded combatant outcome in urban operations. The methodology used was a
    comprehensive search of known and available casualty databases and a review of extant
    literature. The aim being to extrapolate relevant and current data on casualty rates in past operations in urban scenarios across the spectrum of conflict from Peacekeeping to mid-intensity conventional conflict.
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  • 42
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  • Crisis Communications: Quick Reference Guide
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • The quick reference guide provides information concerning several areas, such as, Pre-event, Onset of Incident, Pre-press Conference Checklist, Second and Subsequent Press Conference and ten tips to perfect your communications.
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  • 2
  • 1/7/2015
  • Prepare for Emergencies Now: Information for People with Disabilities
  • Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security, FEMA
  • Your ability to recover from an emergency tomorrow may depend on the planning and preparation you do today. This guide provides tips which individuals with
    disabilities and others with access and functional needs, and the people who assist and support them, can take to prepare for emergencies before they happen.
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  • 2 (161 KB)
  • 1/7/2014
  • Active Shooter Guidelines for Places of Mass Gathering
  • Australia-New Zealand Counter-Terrorism Committee
  • Places of mass gathering (PMG) can pose a broad range of security challenges for their owners and operators. They have been specifically identified—both nationally and internationally—as attractive targets for religious and political extremists, as well as disgruntled or mentally impaired individuals. Armed offender attacks have occurred and continue to occur in crowded places such as sporting, transport and
    entertainment venues.
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  • 20
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  • Active Shooters –The Quiet Threat That Dwells in Your Backyard
  • Nadav Morag, Ph.D., University Dean of Security Studies, Colorado Technical
    University
  • This backgrounder will look at the serious problem of active shooters and attempt to provide some context and understanding of the phenomenon. We will first look at the common characteristics of active shooter attacks, then at the psychological and social behaviors and issues characteristic of active shooters. We will then move on to discussing the law enforcement response to active shooter attacks. Finally, we will conclude with some tips to help businesses prepare for and cope with active shooter threats.
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  • 9
  • 6/2013
  • Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship
  • DHS, FEMA, FBI, DOJ, HHS and DOE
  • This guide provides houses of worship with information regarding emergency operations planning for the spectrum of threats and hazards they may face. It discusses actions that may be taken before, during, and after an incident in order to reduce the impact on property and any loss of life and it encourages every house of worship to develop an EOP
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  • 38
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  • Chapter 3 – The Impact of Violent Video Games: An Overview
  • Craig A. Anderson and Wayne A. Warburton, Chapter in W. Warburton & D. Braunstein (Eds.) Growing Up Fast and Furious: Reviewing the Impacts of Violent and Sexualised Media on Children, (pp. 56-84). Annandale, NSW, Australia: The Federation Press.
  • Parents often ask about the effects of violent video games on their children and teenagers. In most cases, they note that their “common sense” instinct is that too much exposure to violent video games must have some sort of negative effect on their children, but that they have read in the media that “the jury is still out” on violent media effects or that there is no convincing evidence that violent video game playing is harmful.
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  • 29
  • 3/2011
  • Emergency Response Protocols to Active Shooters: Retail-specific Supplement to DHS Active Shooter Material
  • National Retail Federation
  • As retailers continue to update their existing policies and procedures to make sure that their stores and facilities have prepared, planned, drilled and re-trained for crisis situations, there is still a need to keep information in front of associates. In light of this new publication, the retail-specific guidelines have been updated to reflect new incidents and relevant information.
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  • 20
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  • Offender and Offense Characteristics of a Nonrandom Sample of Mass Murderers
  • Anthony G. Hempel, D.O., M.A., J. Reid Meloy, Ph.D., Thomas C. Richards, M.D. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
  • A nonrandom sample (N=30) of mass murderers in the United States and Canada during the past fifty years was studied. Data suggest that such individuals are single or divorced males in their fourth decade of life with various Axis I paranoid and/or depressive conditions and Axis II personality traits and disorders, usually Cluster A and B. The mass murder is precipitated by a major loss related to employment or relationship
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  • 25
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  • A Disaster Protection and Recovery Planning Toolkit for the Small to Mid-Sized Business
  • Institute for Business & Home Safety
  • Disasters, by their very nature, are highly unpredictable and it is impossible to fully anticipate every situation and loss that may occur should one strike. Similarly,every business faces unique risks and challenges, and plans and techniques that work well for one business may not work for another. Even so, IBHS believes that thorough, well-considered planning can reduce the risks any business might face and the losses it might suffer should a disaster strike.
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  • 49
  • 3/2014
  • Critical Issues in Policing Series: The Police Response to Active Shooter
    Incidents
  • Police Educational Research Forum
  • The report provides a series of speakers, sidebars and discussions concerning active shooting from a law enforcement perspective
  • Click Here
  • 60
  • Date
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  • 2014
  • Incorporating Active Shooter Incidents Planning into Health Care Facility
    Emergency Operations Plans
  • Department of Health and Human Services, Federal Bureau of Investigation and
    Department of Homeland Security
  • This document is primarily designed to encourage facilities to consider how to better prepare for an active shooter1 incident. Though hospitals and many other HCFs have emergency operations plans (EOPs), this document provides emergency planners, disaster committees, executive leadership, and others involved in emergency operations planning with detailed discussions of unique issues faced in an HCF. This document also includes discussions on related topics, including information sharing, psychological first aid (PFA), and law enforcement/security.
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  • 33
  • 1/2014
  • Active Shooter Planning and Response in a Healthcare Setting
  • Healthcare & Public Health Sector Coordinating Councils, Public Private
    Partnership
  • Active shooter events in a healthcare setting present unique challenges: a potentially large vulnerable patient population, hazardous materials (including infectious disease), locked units, special challenges (such as weapons and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines (these machines contain large magnets which can fire a weapon or remove it from the hands of law enforcement, as well as caregivers who can respond
    to treat victims.
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  • 23
  • 12/19/12
  • Hospital Code Silver Activations: Active Shooter Planning Checklist
  • California Hospital Association
  • It is not the intent of this document to address every aspect for planning or responding to an active shooter event. This checklist is intended to assist in the discussion and decision-making process and facilitate the development of plans for an active shooter situation. This checklist is designed to prompt consideration of critical decision-making factors, determine protocols for activation, lockdown or evacuation plans while considering facility risk, safety and community threat assessment reviews of an active shooter scenario.
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  • 5
  • 12/2007
  • Violence Against Nurses: An Assessment of the Causes and Impacts of Violence in Nursing Education and Practice
  • National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, fifth Annual Report
  • The purpose of this report is to highlight the recommendations of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) with regard to this issue. In developing this report, the NACNEP conducted a review and assessment of the problem of violence against nurses. Analysis presented within this report is based on presentations by subject-matter experts, discussions, and workgroup sessions held by the NACNEP members.
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  • 80
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  • 7/01/14
  • United States Active Shooter Events from 2000 to 2010: Training and Equipment Implications
  • J. Pete Blair, Ph.D., M. Hunter Martaindale, M.S., and Terry Nichols, M.S. Texas State University
  • Although not an exhaustive review of each incident, this evaluation identified a steady rise in incidents, as well as a consistent increase in the number of those shot and killed. The data establish that officers must have the equipment with them to engage the shooter to end the threat and must be prepared to administer medical assistance to the wounded before emergency medical services (EMS) arrive.
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  • 12
  • 9/2013
  • Fire/Emergency Medical Services Department Operational Considerations and Guide for Active Shooter and Mass Casualty Incidents
  • U.S. Fire Administration
  • This paper was developed as a fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) resource that can be used to support planning and preparation for active shooter and mass
    casualty incidents (AS/MCIs).
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  • 17
  • 4/2013
  • Violence in the Federal Workplace: A Guide for Prevention and Response
  • Interagency Security Committee
  • Fortunately, tragic events such as these are still the exception: most acts of workplace violence occur as some form of verbal or non-verbal threat, bullying harassment, or non-fatal physical assault. However, it is important to remember acts of physical workplace violence might start as some form of non-physical assault, so agencies must take all threats seriously and respond appropriately.
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  • 80
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  • Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation
  • Raymond W. Kelly, Police Commissioner, New York City Police Department
  • The NYPD developed these recommendations based on a close analysis of active shooter incidents from 1966 to 2010. This Compendium of cases, presented in the
    Appendix, includes 281 active shooter incidents. It is organized chronologically by type of facility targeted, including office buildings, open commercial areas, factories and warehouses, schools, and other settings
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  • 182
  • 3/2011
  • Special Report: Workplace Violence, 1993 - 2009
  • U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice
    Statistics
  • This report provides an overview of fatal and nonfatal violence in the workplace. It discusses differences in workplace violence among various occupations. It includes trend information and discusses victim demographics and crime characteristics such as victim injury and police notification. It also includes comparisons to violence outside of the workplace against employed persons and violence against persons not
    employed.
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  • 18
  • 4/8/2008
  • The Insider Threat to Critical Infrastructure
  • The National Infrastructure Advisory Council’s final Report and Recommendations
  • The NIAC’s primary goal was to address the assigned tasks and develop policy recommendations for the President and DHS in an effort to improve the security posture of our Nation’s critical infrastructures. The NIAC also sought to leverage its findings to increase understanding of the insider threat and help CIKR operators mitigate insider threats.
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  • 56
  • 9/16/2013
  • A Study of Active Shooter Incidents in the united States Between 2000 to 2012
  • U. S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • To provide further clarity on these threats, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in 2014 initiated a study of “active shooter” incidents. The goal of the FBI study is to provide federal, state, and local law enforcement with data so they can better understand how to prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from these incidents.
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  • 47
  • 6/2012
  • Thesis – Defeating the Active Shooter: Applying Facility Upgrades in Order to Mitigate the Effects of Active Shooters in High Occupancy Facilities
  • Charles E. Ergenbright and Sean Hubbard, Naval Postgraduate School
  • This thesis contains 14 case studies that examine lethal Active Shooter incidents that occurred in U.S. IHEs, as well as the Oslo and Utoya Island Active Shooter event that occurred in Norway.
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  • 277
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  • 2007
  • Responding to and recovering from an active shooter incident that turns into a hostage situation
  • U.S. Department of Education, Emergency Response and Crisis Management
    Technical Assistance Center, Lessons Learned From School Crises and Emergencies, Vol 2, Issue 6
  • This issue of Lessons Learned is based on a recounting of actual events.School and student name have been changed to protect identities. Information for this publication was gathered through a series of interviews with school stakeholders involved in the events. The contents of this document are not prescriptive best practice for every school or school district, but rather suggestions to consider in a school or
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  • 16
  • 4/2010
  • Campus Attacks: Targeted Violence Affects Institutions of Higher
    Education
  • U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Department of Education and Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • The goal of this collaborative endeavor was to understand the scope of the problem of targeted violence at IHEs. To that end, this report offers preliminary findings from a review of 272 incidents of violence that affected IHEs in the United States from 1900 through 2008.
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  • 40
  • 3/2013
  • Defeating the Active Shooter: Applying facility upgrades in order to
    mitigate the effects of active shooters in high occupancy facilities , “A Meaningful
    Change
  • Chuck Ergenbright, The CIP Report, Center for Infrastructure Protection and
    Homeland Security, volume 11, Number 9, George Mason University, School of Law
  • The intent of the recommendations included in the thesis is to reduce the Rate of Kill of Active Shooters in U.S. IHEs. The research includes 14 case studies examining lethal Active Shooter incidents occurring in U.S. IHEs, as well as the Oslo and Utoya Island Active Shooter event which occurred in Norway.
  • Click Here
  • 21
  • 3/5/2013
  • Responding to an Active Shooter Plan
  • Chief Steve Pearson, Department of Public Safety, Claflin University
  • This document provides guidance to faculty, staff, and students who may be caught in an active shooter situation, and describes what to expect from responding
    police officers.
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  • 13
  • 2013
  • Guide for developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Institutions of Higher Education
  • DHS, FEMA, FBI, DOJ, HHS and DOE
  • Our nation’s postsecondary institutions are entrusted to provide a safe and healthy learning environment for students, faculty, and staff who live, work, and study on campus. Faced with emergencies ranging from active shooter situations to fires, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and pandemic influenza, this is no easy task. Many of these emergencies occur with little to no warning; therefore, it is critical for institutions of higher education (IHEs) to plan ahead to help ensure the safety and general welfare of all members of the campus community.
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  • 95
  • 1/7/2015
  • Emergency Operations Plan
  • Fayetteville State University
  • It is the intention of Fayetteville State University (“University”) to provide a safe environment for members of the University community. In support of this goal, the University has developed an all hazards approach to managing disasters/emergencies (“emergency incident”) to include mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. This approach is detailed in this Emergency Operations Plan (“EOP”). The EOP is organized into a Basic Plan and Annexes. Each Annex addresses a specific functional area and outlines in a more detailed manner the responsibilities and operations of that functional area.
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  • 22
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  • The School Shooter: A Threat Assessment Perspective
  • Mary Ellen O’Toole, Ph.D. U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Critical Incident Response Group, National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crimes
  • This model is not a "profile" of the school shooter or a checklist of danger signs pointing to the next adolescent who will bring lethal violence to a school. Those things do not exist. Although the risk of an actual shooting incident in any one school is very low, threats of violence are potentially a problem in any school. Once a threat is made, having a fair, rational, and standardized method of evaluating and responding to threats is critically important.
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  • 52
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  • Guide for Preventing and Responding to School Violence, 2nd Edition
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police, U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • The purpose of this document is to present different strategies and approaches for members of school communities to consider when creating safer learning environments. No two schools are exactly alike, so it is impossible to establish one plan that will work well in all schools.
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  • 53
  • 6/2014
  • Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2013
  • Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics
  • This report is the sixteenth in a series of annual publications produced jointly by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), Institute of Education Sciences (IES), in the U.S. Department of Education, and the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in the U.S. Department of Justice. This report presents the most recent data available on school crime and student safety.
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  • Protecting Ohio Schoolchildren: An OSBA Guide to School Safety and Security
  • Ohio School Boards Association
  • This white paper addresses a wide range of topics, including core components of school security, legal requirements of school safety plans and considerations before arming staff members. A variety of schools in Ohio and the U.S. have recently discussed or taken action to arm staff members. OSBA strongly believes the decision to arm staff should be made only after a thorough and deliberate review of all aspects of the school safety and security plan. This white paper seeks to address school security as a whole, including the possibility of armed staff. It offers useful information and resources about safety issues for school board members and school administrators.
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  • 24
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  • Psychiatric Medications and School Shooters
  • Peter Langman, Ph.D.
  • What is the evidence supporting the link between psychiatric drugs and school shootings? This article examines the issue from two perspectives: the societal and the individual. The societal perspective considers the overall claim that the rise in medication use has caused a rise in violence, and the individual perspective examine claims about specific shooters going on rampages due to medications
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  • 8
  • 9/2009
  • San Francisco Unified School District, School Site Emergency Plan
  • San Francisco Unified School District
  • The School Site Emergency Plan is designed for use as a school resource for prevention/mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning and training as well as functioning as a template for meeting the requirements for the annual Safety Plan Process under Senate Bill 187, Education Code Section 35294, Statutes of 1998, and the National Incident Management System
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  • 49
  • 5/2002
  • The Final Report and Findings of the Safe School Initiative: Implications for the Prevention of School Attacks in the United States
  • Source: U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Department of Education
  • This document, the Safe School Initiative’s final report, details how our two agencies studied school-based attacks and what we found. Some of the findings may surprise you. It is clear that there is no simple explanation as to why these attacks have occurred. Nor is there a simple solution to stop this problem. But the findings of the Safe School Initiative do suggest that some future attacks may be preventable, if those responsible for safety in schools know what questions to ask and where to uncover information that may help with efforts to intervene before a school attack can occur.
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  • 63
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  • 2008
  • Workplace Violence: APNA 2008 Position Statement, Executive Summary
  • American Psychiatric Nurses Association
  • To examine the scope of the problem and to identify solutions, the APNA chartered a Task Force on Workplace Violence in May 2007. Content experts conducted a comprehensive review of the literature focusing on the following practice areas: inpatient psychiatric settings, outpatient settings, emergency departments, nonpsychiatric areas such as home care, and academic environments.
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  • 69
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  • Workplace Violence: Issues in Response
  • U. S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Critical Incident
    Response Group, National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime
  • The NCAVC, working with a select group of experts in violence and violent behavior, and looking at this issue from a law enforcement and behavioral perspective, wanted to examine issues in prevention, threat assessment and management, crisis management, critical incident response,researchand legislation.
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  • 80
  • 11/2014
  • Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs
  • CDC Workplace Safety and Health Report from Conference partnering with
    Workplace Violence Prevention: Translating Research to Practice
  • As part of its WPV Research and Prevention Initiative during 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) convened a series of stakeholder meetings that focused on various types of WPV and the industries and occupations at risk. The purpose of these meetings was to bring together subject matter experts from business, academia, government, and labor organizations to discuss current progress, research gaps, and collaborative efforts in addressing WPV.
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  • 52
  • n/a
  • Recovery in the Aftermath of Workplace violence: Guidance for Supervisors
  • Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the
    Health Sciences
  • Supervisors face particular challenges following any violent incident in the work setting. Even after the work area is secured, and victims or perpetrators are no longer present, emotional reactions and distress behaviors may compromise performance. Leaders may take steps to reduce untoward consequences for employees and for the
    workplace.
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  • 2
  • 3/2011
  • Workplace Violence: 1993-2009, National Crime Victimization Survey and the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
  • Erika Harrell, Ph.D, US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics
  • According to 2009 preliminary data, 521 persons age 16 or older were victims of homicide in the workplace. In about a third of workplace homicides from 2005-2009, the victim worked in a sales or office occupation. The data on homicides in this report are based on the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI).
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  • 2002
  • Workplace Violence OSHA Fact Sheet
  • Source: U.S. Departmet of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration
  • Workplace violence is violence or the threat of violence against workers. It can occur at or outside the workplace and can range from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and homicide, one of the leading causes of job-related deaths. However it manifests itself, workplace violence is a growing concern for employers and employees nationwide.
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  • 2
  • n/a
  • Combating Workplace Violence: Guidelines for Employers and Law Enforcement
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • The document focuses on violence committed by non-strangers (e.g., coworkers, bosses, clients, domestic partners) within a common worksite (e.g., factory, office, shop, construction site). It is important to note that many forms of workplace violence are not addressed, such as robbery, terrorism, and assaults while employees are working off-site.
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  • 2011
  • 2011 Report on Workplace Violence: A complete Guide to managing Today’s and Tomorrow’s Threats
  • Institute of Finance and Management
  • This report is designed to help organizations adapt to changes in the law; implement new tools, strategies, and knowledge; and incorporate lessons learned to strengthen existing violence prevention efforts. It also details the full range of fundamental elements that a violence prevention program must build upon to be a living, breathing part of the organization— one that ensures ongoing commitment and continuous improvement.
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  • 246
  • 10/27/2006
  • Survey of Workplace Violence Prevention 2005
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor
  • Several surveys were conducted including findings, such as Employees can be affected by workplace violence in a number of ways including increased fear, lower morale, and higher absenteeism. Employees in 36 percent of the establishments having an incident of workplace violence in the previous 12 months were negatively affected.
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